Cribado de cancer de prostata – Screening of prostaste cancer


Prostate and bladder, sagittal section.Image via Wikipedia

Editorial del NEJM 26 de Marzo 2009


In the United States, most men over the age of 50 years have had a prostate-specific–antigen (PSA) test,1 despite the absence of evidence from large, randomized trials of a net benefit. Moreover, about 95% of male urologists and 78% of primary care physicians who are 50 years of age or older report that they have had a PSA test themselves,2 a finding that suggests they are practicing what they preach. And indeed, U.S. death rates from prostate cancer have fallen about 4% per year since 1992, five years after the introduction of PSA testing.3 Perhaps the answer to the PSA controversy is already staring us in the face. At the same time, practice guidelines cite the unproven benefit of PSA screening, as well as the known side effects,4,5 which largely reflect the high risks of overdiagnosis and overtreatment that PSA-based screening engenders.6
The first reports from two large, randomized trials that many observers hoped would settle the controversy appear in this issue of the Journal. In the U.S. Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial, Andriole et al.7 report no mortality benefit from combined screening with PSA testing and digital rectal examination during a median follow-up of 11 years.8 In the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC) trial, Schröder et al.8 report that PSA screening without digital rectal examination was associated with a 20% relative reduction in the death rate from prostate cancer at a median follow-up of 9 years, with an absolute reduction of about 7 prostate cancer deaths per 10,000 men screened.8 The designs of the two trials are different and provide complementary insights.
First, one must ask, “Why were these results published now?” Neither set of findings seems definitive; that is, there was neither a clear declaration of futility in the PLCO trial nor an unambiguous net benefit in the ERSPC trial. Both studies are ongoing, with future updates promised. The report on the ERSPC trial follows a third planned interim analysis, which found a marginally significant decrease in prostate-cancer mortality after adjustment of the P value for the two previous looks in an attempt to avoid a false positive conclusion (yet apparently preserving no alpha for the planned final analysis). On the other hand, the investigators in the PLCO trial made the decision to publish their results now because of concern about the emerging evidence of net harm compared with potential benefits associated with PSA screening. Both decisions to publish now can be criticized as premature, leaving clinicians and patients to deal with the ambiguity.
The ERSPC trial is actually a collection of trials in different countries with different eligibility criteria, randomization schemes, and strategies for screening and follow-up. The report by Schröder et al. is based on a predefined core group of men between 55 and 69 years of age at study entry. Subjects were generally screened every 4 years, and 82% were screened at least once. Contamination of the control group with screening as part of usual care is not described. Biopsies were generally recommended for subjects with PSA levels of more than 3.0 ng per milliliter. It is unclear whether the clinicians and hospitals treating patients with prostate cancer differed between the two study groups.
Adjudications of causes of death were made by committees whose members were unaware of study-group assignments, though not of treatments. This point is important, since previous research has suggested that the cause of death is less likely to be attributed to prostate cancer among men receiving attempted curative treatment.9 Misattribution might then create a bias toward screening, since the diagnosis of more early-stage cancers in the ERSPC trial led to substantially more attempted curative treatments.
The ERSPC interim analysis revealed a 20% reduction in prostate-cancer mortality; the adjusted P value was 0.04. The estimated absolute reduction in prostate-cancer mortality of about 7 deaths per 10,000 men after 9 years of follow-up, if real and not the result of chance or bias, must be weighed against the additional interventions and burdens. The 73,000 men in the screening group underwent more than 17,000 biopsies, undoubtedly many more than did men in the control group, though the latter is not reported. Men had a substantially higher cumulative risk of receiving the diagnosis of prostate cancer in the screening group than in the control group (820 vs. 480 per 10,000 men). Diagnosis led to more treatment, with 277 versus 100 per 10,000 men undergoing radical prostatectomy and 220 versus 123 per 10,000 undergoing radiation therapy with or without hormones, respectively (tentative estimates given the unknown treatments in both groups).
Although estimates of the benefit of screening were somewhat greater for men who actually underwent testing (taking into account noncompliance) than for those who were not tested, the side effects would be proportionately higher as well. Given these trade-offs, the promise of future ERSPC analyses addressing quality of life and cost-effectiveness is welcome indeed. The ERSPC results also reemphasize the need for caution in screening men over the age of 69 years, given an early trend toward higher prostate-cancer mortality with screening in this age subgroup, although this finding may well be due to chance alone.
A final point to make about the ERSPC trial is that to the extent that the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer in the screening group differed from those in the control group, it becomes difficult to dissect out the benefit attributable to screening versus improved treatment once prostate cancer was suspected or diagnosed. A similar distribution of treatments among seemingly similar patients with cancer is only partially reassuring in this regard.
Despite a longer median follow-up, the PLCO trial was smaller and therefore less mature than the ERSPC trial, with 174 prostate-cancer deaths driving the power of the study, as compared with 540 such deaths in the ERSPC trial. The screening protocol was homogeneous across sites with an enrollment age of 55 to 74 years and annual PSA tests for 6 years and digital rectal examinations for 4 years, with about 85% compliance. Subjects in the screening group who had a suspicious digital rectal examination or a PSA level of more than 4.0 ng per milliliter received a recommendation for further evaluation. This strategy helped to ensure that any difference in outcome was attributable to screening, rather than downstream management. The effectiveness of screening, of course, will be determined by the effectiveness of subsequent “usual care,” but this is the same usual care that many practitioners assume has been responsible for the falling U.S. death rate from prostate cancer. Adjudication of causes of death was similar to that in the ERSPC trial.
Though the PLCO trial has shown no significant effect on prostate-cancer mortality to date, the relatively low number of end points begets a wide confidence interval, which includes at its lower margin the point estimate of effect from the ERSPC trial. Other likely explanations for the negative findings are high levels of prescreening in the PLCO population and contamination of the control group. Contamination was assessed by periodic cross-sectional surveys, with about half the subjects in the control group undergoing PSA testing by year 5. It is unclear whether these estimates reflect testing that year or since trial inception; if the former, the cumulative incidence may be even higher. The smaller difference in screening intensity between the two study groups in the PLCO trial, as compared with the ERSPC trial, is reflected in a smaller risk of overdiagnosis (23% vs. more than 70%) and a less impressive shift in cancer stage and grade distributions. Given that study-group contamination from the use of digital rectal examination was less problematic (only about 25%), ongoing results from both of these trials may necessitate rethinking the role of digital rectal examination in cancer screening.
After digesting these reports, where do we stand regarding the PSA controversy? Serial PSA screening has at best a modest effect on prostate-cancer mortality during the first decade of follow-up. This benefit comes at the cost of substantial overdiagnosis and overtreatment. It is important to remember that the key question is not whether PSA screening is effective but whether it does more good than harm. For this reason, comparisons of the ERSPC estimates of the effectiveness of PSA screening with, for example, the similarly modest effectiveness of breast-cancer screening cannot be made without simultaneously appreciating the much higher risks of overdiagnosis and overtreatment associated with PSA screening.
The report on the ERSPC trial appropriately notes that 1410 men would need to be offered screening and an additional 48 would need to be treated to prevent one prostate-cancer death during a 10-year period, assuming the point estimate is correct. And although the PLCO trial may not have the power as yet to detect a similarly modest benefit of screening, its power is already more than adequate to detect important harm through overdiagnosis. However, the implications of the trade-offs reflected in these data, like beauty, will be in the eye of the beholder. Some well-informed clinicians and patients will still see these trade-offs as favorable; others will see them as unfavorable. As a result, a shared decision-making approach to PSA screening, as recommended by most guidelines, seems more appropriate than ever.
Finally, despite these critiques, both groups of investigators deserve high praise for their persistence and perseverance: to manage such monstrous trials is a herculean task, made no easier when so many observers think the results are self-evident. Further analyses will be needed from these trials, as well as from others — such as the Prostate Cancer Intervention Versus Observation Trial (PIVOT) in the United States (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00007644 [ClinicalTrials.gov] )10 and the Prostate Testing for Cancer and Treatment (PROTECT) trial in the United Kingdom (Current Controlled Trials number, ISRCTN20141297 [controlled-trials.com] )11 — if the PSA controversy is finally to sleep the big sleep.
No potential conflict of interest relevant to this article was reported.

Source Information

From Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston.

This article (10.1056/NEJMe0901166) was published at NEJM.org on March 18, 2009.
References

  1. Ross LE, Berkowitz Z, Ekwueme DU. Use of the prostate-specific antigen test among U.S. men: findings from the 2005 National Health Interview Survey. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2008;17:636-644. [Free Full Text]
  2. Chan EC, Barry MJ, Vernon SW, Ahn C. Brief report: physicians and their personal prostate cancer-screening practices with prostate-specific antigen: a national survey. J Gen Intern Med 2006;21:257-259. [CrossRef][ISI][Medline]
  3. Ries LAG, Melbert D, Krapcho M, et al. SEER cancer statistics review, 1975–2005. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute, 2008. (Accessed March 6, 2009 at http://seer.cancer.gov/csr/1975_2005/.)
  4. Smith RA, Cokkinides V, Brawley OW. Cancer screening in the United States, 2008: a review of current American Cancer Society guidelines and cancer screening issues. CA Cancer J Clin 2008;58:161-179. [Free Full Text]
  5. U. S. Preventive Services Task Force. Screening for prostate cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. Ann Intern Med 2008;149:185-191. [Free Full Text]
  6. Barry MJ. Why are a high overdiagnosis probability and a long lead time for prostate cancer screening so important? J Natl Cancer Inst (in press).
  7. Andriole GL, Grubb RL III, Buys SS, et al. Mortality results from a randomized prostate-cancer screening trial. N Engl J Med 2009;360:1310-1319. [Free Full Text]
  8. Schröder FH, Hugosson J, Roobol MJ, et al. Screening and prostate-cancer mortality in a randomized European study. N Engl J Med 2009;360:1320-1328. [Free Full Text]
  9. Newschaffer CJ, Otani K, McDonald MK, Penberthy LT. Causes of death in elderly prostate cancer patients and in a comparison nonprostate cancer cohort. J Natl Cancer Inst 2000;92:613-621. [Free Full Text]
  10. Wilt TJ, Brawer MK, Barry MJ, et al. The Prostate cancer Intervention Versus Observation Trial: VA/NCI/AHRQ Cooperative Studies Program #407 (PIVOT): design and baseline results of a randomized controlled trial comparing radical prostatectomy to watchful waiting for men with clinically localized prostate cancer. Contemp Clin Trials 2009;30:81-87. [CrossRef][ISI][Medline]
  11. Donovan J, Hamdy F, Neal D, et al. Prostate Testing for Cancer and Treatment (ProtecT) feasibility study. Health Technol Assess 2003;7:1-88. [Medline]

El cribado del cancer de prostata no se asocia a una disminucion de la mortalidad


Age-standardised death rates from Prostate can...                              Image via WikipediaConcato J, Wells CK, Horwitz RI, Penson D, Fincke G, Berlowitz DR, et al. The Effectiveness of Screening for Prostate Cancer: A Nested Case-Control Study. Arch Intern Med 2006; 166: 38-43. R TC (s) PDF (s)

Introducción

Diferentes grupos de trabajo han hecho distintas recomendaciones sobre el cribado del cáncer de próstata. A pesar de que el cribado con PSA se ha mostrado eficaz para detectar tumores de próstata asintomáticos, no se ha demostrado claramente que esta detección redunde en una reducción de la mortalidad.

Objetivo

Estudiar si el cribado del cáncer de próstata mediante determinación del PSA con o sin tacto rectal mejora la supervivencia.

Perfil del estudio

Tipo de estudio: Estudio de casos y controles
Área del estudio: Prevención
Ámbito del estudio: Comunitario
Métodos
La población de estudio estuvo formada por los pacientes varones >50 años que se visitaron entre 1989 y 1990 en cualquiera de los 10 centros del departamento de Veterans Affairs del estado de Nueva Inglaterra y que no tenían un diagnóstico de cáncer antes de 1991. Se incluyeron como casos los pacientes a los que se les diagnosticó un cáncer de próstata entre esa fecha y 1995 y que murieron antes de 2000. Para cada uno de los casos se seleccionó un control entre los pacientes que estaban vivos en la fecha de la muerte del caso hubiese sido o no diagnosticado de cáncer de próstata en ese momento ajustado por fecha de nacimiento y centro en el que se había visitado.
Un investigador que desconocía la asignación del paciente a los grupos revisaba las historias clínicas para saber si se le había hecho cribado del cáncer de próstata mediante una determinación del o tacto rectal desde 1991 hasta la fecha del diagnóstico del cáncer de próstata del caso.
La variable principal de resultado fue la muerte por cualquier causa. Como variables secundarias se utilizaron la muerte por cáncer de próstata y el cáncer de próstata progresivo.

Resultados

La figura 1 muestra el flujo de los participantes en el estudio. La edad media fue de 72 años. Entre los casos se detectó un exceso de pacientes de raza negra (10,0% frente a 4,2%; P<0,001)>

Se había llevado a cabo un cribado previo en el 14% de los casos y en el 13% de los controles. No se apreciaron diferencias estadísticamente significativas ni en la mortalidad total, ni en la mortalidad específica por cáncer de próstata ni en los análisis por subgrupos de los pacientes por edad ni en los pacientes con hipertrofia benigna de próstata (tabla 1).

OR (IC95%) P
Mortalidad total 1,08 (0,71 a 1,64) 0,72
Muerte por cáncer de próstata 1,13 (0,63 a 2,08) 0,68

Conclusiones

Los autores concluyen que los resultados de este estudio no sugieren que el cribado mediante PSA ni mediante tacto rectal reduzcan la mortalidad total ni por cáncer de próstata.

Conflictos de interés

Ninguno declarado. Financiado por una beca del Department of Veterans Affairs.

Comentario

El cribado del cáncer de próstata sigue siendo objeto de polémica. A pesar de que el PSA se ha mostrado eficaz para detectarlo, siguen existiendo dudas importantes sobre si este adelanto diagnóstico aporta más beneficios que riesgos. Desde que se ha extendido el cribado mediante PSA (sin que se haya llegado a la universalización del mismo), la probabilidad de que a un adulto se le diagnostique un cáncer de próstata casi se ha doblado. Por otro lado, la cirugía de próstata se acompaña de un elevado riesgo de disfunciones sexuales y de incontinencia. Valdría la pena pagar este precio si los beneficios en términos de mejoría del pronóstico estuviesen claros, pero los resultados de este trabajo arrojan más dudas sobre el tema.
En ausencia de datos inequívocos sobre la eficacia de una técnica de cribado provinientes de estudios de intervención, los estudios de casos y controles se han mostrado útiles para esclarecer la eficacia de algunas técnicas (como en el caso del Papanicolaou). Los autores de este trabajo han elegido como variable de respuesta principal la mortalidad total que parece una variable importante, que evita algunos de los sesgos inherentes a los estudios de prevención (sesgo del adelanto diagnóstico) y permite salvar el problema del posible error en la causa de muerte en el certificado de defunción. Un estudio de casos y controles publicado recientemente y que utilizaba como variable principal la presencia de metástasis por cáncer de próstata sí que encontró una asociación entre el cribado y un menor riesgo.
En 2009 está prevista la publicación de dos estudios de intervención, uno americano y otro europeo, que es probable que despejen las dudas actuales sobre la conveniencia de llevar a cabo o no el cribado.

Bibliografía

  1. Nelson WG, De Marzo AM, Isaacs WB. Prostate cancer. N Engl J Med 2003; 349: 366-381. TC (s) PDF (s)
  2. Barry MJ. The PSA Conundrum. Arch Intern Med 2006; 166: 7-8. TC (s) PDF (s)

Autor

Manuel Iglesias Rodal. Correo electrónico: mrodal@menta.net.

Algo para leer?


Fuente: AP al Dia. 
De revistas:
En internet:
Screening for Depression in Adults[U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF)]

Antigeno Prostatico Especifico: inutil para el cribado de cancer de prostata


Todavia desconozco en que idioma hay que escribir esto, pero por enesima  vez sale otro articulo que dice que la PSA,  no tiene ninguna utilidad en el cribado de cáncer de próstata y que sólo sirve para el seguimiento de pacientes con Cáncer de prostata. El tema es simple. Se trata de una prueba inespecifica, y el famoso antigeno es volumen-dependiente del tamaño de la prostata. Por ende, en la natural evolucion que tenemos los hombres la prostata se agranda con la edad. Por tanto, ningun valor sirve para diferenciar si ese agrandamiento se  debió a la hipertrofia prostática benigna, que también es muy común luego de los 65 años. Por otro lado, un viejo anatomista,  Testut, ya escribia en su tratado que data del año 1900, que en sus autopsias encontraba un 100% de cáncer de prostata en hombres  mayores de 80 años. En otras palabras, y aunque los urólogos se empeñen en poner al cancer de próstata como un grave problema de salud, colocandolo entre las primeras causas de muerte, la realidad indica, que nos morimos más con cáncer de próstata que por el cáncer mismo. Por ende es un buen marcador de la evolución del cáncer pero no tiene ninguna utilidad, escrito en Inglés (también ha sido escrito en castellano, catalán, portugues, francés, ruso, y seguramente en esperanto) por el  British Medical Journal.
Por ende tendremos que seguir lidiando con los expertos que aparecen en la prensa de todo el mundo, e intentan convencer a la gente de hacerse estos estudios desde los 50 años. 

Utilizando una cohorte grande Seuca relacionada con un registro nacional de cáncer, los investigadores compararon los valores iniciales de PSA de aquellos que desarrollaron cáncer de próstata en el curso de 7 años post escrutinio, con otros hombres de similares características que no desarrollaron cáncer de próstata. La sobreposición de los valores de PSA frustraron los esfuerzos de los investigadores de encontrar un valor que tenga alta especificidad así como una sensibilidad del 50%. Sin embargo, notaron que un valor de PSA menor de 1 ng/mL virtualmente descarta el diagnóstico durante el período de seguimiento.

Debido a los resultados de este estudio, se podría decir que los datos sobre los costos y beneficios de las pruebas de PSA permanecen insuficientes para apoyar el escrutinio masivo.

Referencia: Benny Holmström, et al. Prostate specific antigen for early detection of prostate cancer: longitudinal study. BMJ. Septiembre 2009;339:b3537.

USPSTF: Guia para cribado de cancer de colon


right arrow U.S. Preventive Services Task Force* 

4 November 2008 | Volume 149 Issue 9

Description: Update of the 2002 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation statement on screening for colorectal cancer.

Methods: In order to update its recommendation, the USPSTF commissioned 2 studies: 1) a targeted systematic evidence review on 4 selected questions relating to test characteristics andbenefits and harms of screening technologies; and 2) a decision analytic modeling analysis using population modeling techniques to compare the expected health outcomes and resource requirements of available screening modalities when used in a programmatic way over time.

Recommendations: The USPSTF recommends screening for colorectal cancer using fecal occult blood testing, sigmoidoscopy, or colonoscopy in adults, beginning at age 50 years and continuing until age 75 years. The risks and benefits of these screening methods vary. (A recommendation.)

The USPSTF recommends against routine screening for colorectal cancer in adults 76 to 85 years of age. There may be considerations that support colorectal cancer screening in an individual patient. (C recommendation.)

The USPSTF recommends against screening for colorectal cancer in adults older than age 85 years. (D recommendation.)

The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to assess the benefits and harms of computed tomographic colonographyand fecal DNA testing as screening modalities for colorectal cancer. (I statement.)

USPSTF: Guia para cribado de cancer de colon


right arrow U.S. Preventive Services Task Force* 

4 November 2008 | Volume 149 Issue 9

Description: Update of the 2002 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation statement on screening for colorectal cancer.

Methods: In order to update its recommendation, the USPSTF commissioned 2 studies: 1) a targeted systematic evidence review on 4 selected questions relating to test characteristics andbenefits and harms of screening technologies; and 2) a decision analytic modeling analysis using population modeling techniques to compare the expected health outcomes and resource requirements of available screening modalities when used in a programmatic way over time.

Recommendations: The USPSTF recommends screening for colorectal cancer using fecal occult blood testing, sigmoidoscopy, or colonoscopy in adults, beginning at age 50 years and continuing until age 75 years. The risks and benefits of these screening methods vary. (A recommendation.)

The USPSTF recommends against routine screening for colorectal cancer in adults 76 to 85 years of age. There may be considerations that support colorectal cancer screening in an individual patient. (C recommendation.)

The USPSTF recommends against screening for colorectal cancer in adults older than age 85 years. (D recommendation.)

The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to assess the benefits and harms of computed tomographic colonographyand fecal DNA testing as screening modalities for colorectal cancer. (I statement.)

Screening para la depresion detecta multiples comorbilidades


El objetivo de este estudio realizado por investigadores de Australia y España fue reportar las características básicas del Diagnóstico, Manejo y Resultados de la Depresión en Atención Primaria (DIAMOND). Fue un estudio de cohorte, prospectivo y longitudinal que se inició en Enero de 2005 y discutió las implicaciones para la depresión en atención médica general. El estudio incluyó a pacientes adultos con síntomas depresivos identificados a través de tamizaje con la Escala de Depresión del Centro de Estudios Epidemiológicos (CES-D = 16). Se seleccionaron 30 pacientes al azar de la práctica general. El resultado principal fue el estado de depresión según el Cuestionario de Salud del Paciente (PHQ). 

Al inicio del estudio, 47% eran casados, 21% vivían solos, el 36% recibía una pensión o beneficio, el 15% no estaban en condiciones de trabajo, el 23% informó riesgo a la bebida, 32% eran fumadores, 39% utilizaban antidepresivos y el 19% utilizaba sedantes. 27% satisfechos según los criterios actuales para el síndrome depresivo mayor (MDS) en el PHQ, mientras que en el 52% había síntomas persistentes de depresión, y en el 22% había síntomas transitorios depresivos, con una duración de un par de semanas, como máximo. De los que cumplían con los criterios para MDS, el 49% también fueron clasificados con síndrome de ansiedad, 40% reportó abuso sexual infantil, 57% reportó abuso físico infantil, el 42% había en algún momento miedo de su pareja, y el 72% informó de una condición física crónica; el 84% estaba recibiendo atención de salud mental (ya sea que estaba tomando antidepresivos o consultaba con un profesional de la salud específicamente para la atención de salud mental) en comparación con el 66% de aquellos con persistencia de síntomas depresivos y el 57% con síntomas transitorios de depresión.

Los investigadores concluyeron: “Este método de cribado de síntomas depresivos, en la práctica general, identifica a un grupo de pacientes con múltiples comorbilidades sustanciales – psiquiátricas, físicas y sociales que coexisten con los síntomas depresivos, lo que plantea desafíos para el manejo de la depresión en la práctica general. ” 

Otro estudio que muestra que hay mucho más psicopatología entre los pacientes que a menudo no se conocen en la práctica general y que pueden ser detectados por medio del cribado. La presentación de informes de abusos es aterrador.

MJA Junio 16 2008; 188 (12 Suppl): S119-S125 © 2008 The Medical Journal of Australia

¿Qué se identifica cuando se lleva a cabo el cribado de la depresión en la práctica general? Línea de base de los resultados de diagnóstico, el manejo y el desenlace de la Depresión en Atención Primaria (Diamond) estudio longitudinal. Jane M Gunn, Gail P Gilchrist and Patty Chondros et al. Correspondencia a: Jane M Gunn: j.gunn@unimelb.edu.au 

Screening para la depresion detecta multiples comorbilidades


El objetivo de este estudio realizado por investigadores de Australia y España fue reportar las características básicas del Diagnóstico, Manejo y Resultados de la Depresión en Atención Primaria (DIAMOND). Fue un estudio de cohorte, prospectivo y longitudinal que se inició en Enero de 2005 y discutió las implicaciones para la depresión en atención médica general. El estudio incluyó a pacientes adultos con síntomas depresivos identificados a través de tamizaje con la Escala de Depresión del Centro de Estudios Epidemiológicos (CES-D = 16). Se seleccionaron 30 pacientes al azar de la práctica general. El resultado principal fue el estado de depresión según el Cuestionario de Salud del Paciente (PHQ). 

Al inicio del estudio, 47% eran casados, 21% vivían solos, el 36% recibía una pensión o beneficio, el 15% no estaban en condiciones de trabajo, el 23% informó riesgo a la bebida, 32% eran fumadores, 39% utilizaban antidepresivos y el 19% utilizaba sedantes. 27% satisfechos según los criterios actuales para el síndrome depresivo mayor (MDS) en el PHQ, mientras que en el 52% había síntomas persistentes de depresión, y en el 22% había síntomas transitorios depresivos, con una duración de un par de semanas, como máximo. De los que cumplían con los criterios para MDS, el 49% también fueron clasificados con síndrome de ansiedad, 40% reportó abuso sexual infantil, 57% reportó abuso físico infantil, el 42% había en algún momento miedo de su pareja, y el 72% informó de una condición física crónica; el 84% estaba recibiendo atención de salud mental (ya sea que estaba tomando antidepresivos o consultaba con un profesional de la salud específicamente para la atención de salud mental) en comparación con el 66% de aquellos con persistencia de síntomas depresivos y el 57% con síntomas transitorios de depresión.

Los investigadores concluyeron: “Este método de cribado de síntomas depresivos, en la práctica general, identifica a un grupo de pacientes con múltiples comorbilidades sustanciales – psiquiátricas, físicas y sociales que coexisten con los síntomas depresivos, lo que plantea desafíos para el manejo de la depresión en la práctica general. ” 

Otro estudio que muestra que hay mucho más psicopatología entre los pacientes que a menudo no se conocen en la práctica general y que pueden ser detectados por medio del cribado. La presentación de informes de abusos es aterrador.

MJA Junio 16 2008; 188 (12 Suppl): S119-S125 © 2008 The Medical Journal of Australia

¿Qué se identifica cuando se lleva a cabo el cribado de la depresión en la práctica general? Línea de base de los resultados de diagnóstico, el manejo y el desenlace de la Depresión en Atención Primaria (Diamond) estudio longitudinal. Jane M Gunn, Gail P Gilchrist and Patty Chondros et al. Correspondencia a: Jane M Gunn: j.gunn@unimelb.edu.au 

Screening for COPD using spyrometry


right arrow Kenneth Lin, MDBradley Watkins, MDTamara Johnson, MD, MS;Joy Anne Rodriguez, MD, MPH; and Mary B. Barton, MD, MPP  1 April 2008 | Volume 148 Issue 7 | Pages 535-543

Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. Fewer than half of the estimated 24 million Americans with airflow obstruction have received a COPD diagnosis, and diagnosis often occurs in advanced stages of the disease.

Purpose: To summarize the evidence on screening for COPD using spirometry for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF).

Data Sources: English-language articles identified in PubMed and the Cochrane Library through January 2007, recent systematic reviews, expert suggestions, and reference lists of retrievedarticles.

Study Selection: Explicit inclusion and exclusion criteria were used for each of the 8 key questions on benefits and harms of screening. Eligible study types varied by question.

Data Extraction: Studies were reviewed, abstracted, and rated for quality by using predefined USPSTF criteria.

Data Synthesis: Pharmacologic treatments for COPD reduce acute exacerbations in patients with severe disease. However, severe COPD is uncommon in the general U.S. population. Spirometryhas not been shown to independently increase smoking cessation rates. Potential harms from screening include false-positive results and adverse effects from subsequent unnecessary therapy.Data on the prevalence of airflow obstruction in the U.S. population were used to calculate projected outcomes from screening groups defined by age and smoking status.

Limitation: No studies provide direct evidence on health outcomes associated with screening for COPD.

Conclusion: Screening for COPD using spirometry is likely to identify a predominance of patients with mild to moderate airflowobstruction who would not experience additional health benefits if labeled as having COPD. Hundreds of patients would need toundergo spirometry to defer a single exacerbation. 

Annals 2008 148: I-46. [Full Text]  

Screening for COPD using spyrometry


right arrow Kenneth Lin, MDBradley Watkins, MDTamara Johnson, MD, MS;Joy Anne Rodriguez, MD, MPH; and Mary B. Barton, MD, MPP  1 April 2008 | Volume 148 Issue 7 | Pages 535-543

Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. Fewer than half of the estimated 24 million Americans with airflow obstruction have received a COPD diagnosis, and diagnosis often occurs in advanced stages of the disease.

Purpose: To summarize the evidence on screening for COPD using spirometry for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF).

Data Sources: English-language articles identified in PubMed and the Cochrane Library through January 2007, recent systematic reviews, expert suggestions, and reference lists of retrievedarticles.

Study Selection: Explicit inclusion and exclusion criteria were used for each of the 8 key questions on benefits and harms of screening. Eligible study types varied by question.

Data Extraction: Studies were reviewed, abstracted, and rated for quality by using predefined USPSTF criteria.

Data Synthesis: Pharmacologic treatments for COPD reduce acute exacerbations in patients with severe disease. However, severe COPD is uncommon in the general U.S. population. Spirometryhas not been shown to independently increase smoking cessation rates. Potential harms from screening include false-positive results and adverse effects from subsequent unnecessary therapy.Data on the prevalence of airflow obstruction in the U.S. population were used to calculate projected outcomes from screening groups defined by age and smoking status.

Limitation: No studies provide direct evidence on health outcomes associated with screening for COPD.

Conclusion: Screening for COPD using spirometry is likely to identify a predominance of patients with mild to moderate airflowobstruction who would not experience additional health benefits if labeled as having COPD. Hundreds of patients would need toundergo spirometry to defer a single exacerbation. 

Annals 2008 148: I-46. [Full Text]  

Screening for COPD using spyrometry


Screening for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Using Spirometry: Summary of the Evidence for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

right arrow Kenneth Lin, MD; Bradley Watkins, MD; Tamara Johnson, MD, MS;Joy Anne Rodriguez, MD, MPH; and Mary B. Barton, MD, MPP 

1 April 2008 | Volume 148 Issue 7 | Pages 535-543

Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. Fewer than half of the estimated 24 million Americans with airflow obstruction have received a COPD diagnosis, and diagnosis often occurs in advanced stages of the disease.

Purpose: To summarize the evidence on screening for COPD using spirometry for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF).

Data Sources: English-language articles identified in PubMed and the Cochrane Library through January 2007, recent systematic reviews, expert suggestions, and reference lists of retrievedarticles.

Study Selection: Explicit inclusion and exclusion criteria were used for each of the 8 key questions on benefits and harms of screening. Eligible study types varied by question.

Data Extraction: Studies were reviewed, abstracted, and rated for quality by using predefined USPSTF criteria.

Data Synthesis: Pharmacologic treatments for COPD reduce acute exacerbations in patients with severe disease. However, severe COPD is uncommon in the general U.S. population. Spirometryhas not been shown to independently increase smoking cessation rates. Potential harms from screening include false-positive results and adverse effects from subsequent unnecessary therapy.Data on the prevalence of airflow obstruction in the U.S. population were used to calculate projected outcomes from screening groups defined by age and smoking status.

Limitation: No studies provide direct evidence on health outcomes associated with screening for COPD.

Conclusion: Screening for COPD using spirometry is likely to identify a predominance of patients with mild to moderate airflowobstruction who would not experience additional health benefits if labeled as having COPD. Hundreds of patients would need toundergo spirometry to defer a single exacerbation.

Author and Article Information

space

From the Center for Primary Care, Prevention, and Clinical Partnerships, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, Maryland; Washington DC Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Washington, D.C.; University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; and Brooks Air Force Base, Brooks City-Base, Texas.

Acknowledgment: The authors thank Timothy Wilt, MD, MPH, and co-investigators at the Minnesota Evidence-based Practice Center, for generously sharing data that were not yet published when this review was written. They also thank Caryn McManus and Gloria Washington at the AHRQ for technical assistance with the literature searches and compilation of data.

Potential Financial Conflicts of Interest: None disclosed.

Requests for Single Reprints: Kenneth Lin, MD, Center for Primary Care, Prevention, and Clinical Partnerships, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 540 Gaither Road, Rockville, MD 20850; e-mail, kenneth.lin@ahrq.hhs.gov.

Current Author Addresses: Drs. Lin and Barton: Center for Primary Care, Prevention, and Clinical Partnerships, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 540 Gaither Road, Rockville, MD 20850.

Dr. Watkins: Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 50 Irving St NW, Washington, DC 20422.

Dr. Johnson: University of Maryland School of Medicine, 655 West Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201.

Dr. Rodriguez: Brooks Air Force Base, Brooks City-Base, TX 78235.


Related articles in Annals:

Clinical Guidelines 
Screening for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Using Spirometry: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement
U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

Annals 2008 148: 529-534. [ABSTRACT][SUMMARY][Full Text]  

Summaries for Patients 
Screening for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendations

Annals 2008 148: I-46. [Full Text]  


Screening for COPD using spyrometry


Screening for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Using Spirometry: Summary of the Evidence for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

right arrow Kenneth Lin, MD; Bradley Watkins, MD; Tamara Johnson, MD, MS;Joy Anne Rodriguez, MD, MPH; and Mary B. Barton, MD, MPP 

1 April 2008 | Volume 148 Issue 7 | Pages 535-543

Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. Fewer than half of the estimated 24 million Americans with airflow obstruction have received a COPD diagnosis, and diagnosis often occurs in advanced stages of the disease.

Purpose: To summarize the evidence on screening for COPD using spirometry for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF).

Data Sources: English-language articles identified in PubMed and the Cochrane Library through January 2007, recent systematic reviews, expert suggestions, and reference lists of retrievedarticles.

Study Selection: Explicit inclusion and exclusion criteria were used for each of the 8 key questions on benefits and harms of screening. Eligible study types varied by question.

Data Extraction: Studies were reviewed, abstracted, and rated for quality by using predefined USPSTF criteria.

Data Synthesis: Pharmacologic treatments for COPD reduce acute exacerbations in patients with severe disease. However, severe COPD is uncommon in the general U.S. population. Spirometryhas not been shown to independently increase smoking cessation rates. Potential harms from screening include false-positive results and adverse effects from subsequent unnecessary therapy.Data on the prevalence of airflow obstruction in the U.S. population were used to calculate projected outcomes from screening groups defined by age and smoking status.

Limitation: No studies provide direct evidence on health outcomes associated with screening for COPD.

Conclusion: Screening for COPD using spirometry is likely to identify a predominance of patients with mild to moderate airflowobstruction who would not experience additional health benefits if labeled as having COPD. Hundreds of patients would need toundergo spirometry to defer a single exacerbation.

Author and Article Information

space

From the Center for Primary Care, Prevention, and Clinical Partnerships, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, Maryland; Washington DC Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Washington, D.C.; University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; and Brooks Air Force Base, Brooks City-Base, Texas.

Acknowledgment: The authors thank Timothy Wilt, MD, MPH, and co-investigators at the Minnesota Evidence-based Practice Center, for generously sharing data that were not yet published when this review was written. They also thank Caryn McManus and Gloria Washington at the AHRQ for technical assistance with the literature searches and compilation of data.

Potential Financial Conflicts of Interest: None disclosed.

Requests for Single Reprints: Kenneth Lin, MD, Center for Primary Care, Prevention, and Clinical Partnerships, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 540 Gaither Road, Rockville, MD 20850; e-mail, kenneth.lin@ahrq.hhs.gov.

Current Author Addresses: Drs. Lin and Barton: Center for Primary Care, Prevention, and Clinical Partnerships, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 540 Gaither Road, Rockville, MD 20850.

Dr. Watkins: Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 50 Irving St NW, Washington, DC 20422.

Dr. Johnson: University of Maryland School of Medicine, 655 West Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201.

Dr. Rodriguez: Brooks Air Force Base, Brooks City-Base, TX 78235.


Related articles in Annals:

Clinical Guidelines 
Screening for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Using Spirometry: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement
U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

Annals 2008 148: 529-534. [ABSTRACT][SUMMARY][Full Text]  

Summaries for Patients 
Screening for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendations

Annals 2008 148: I-46. [Full Text]  


El cribado del cancer de prostata no se asocia a una disminucion de la mortalidad


Concato J, Wells CK, Horwitz RI, Penson D, Fincke G, Berlowitz DR, et al. The Effectiveness of Screening for Prostate Cancer: A Nested Case-Control Study. Arch Intern Med 2006; 166: 38-43. R TC (s) PDF (s)

Introducción

Diferentes grupos de trabajo han hecho distintas recomendaciones sobre el cribado del cáncer de próstata. A pesar de que el cribado con PSA se ha mostrado eficaz para detectar tumores de próstata asintomáticos, no se ha demostrado claramente que esta detección redunde en una reducción de la mortalidad.

Objetivo

Estudiar si el cribado del cáncer de próstata mediante determinación del PSA con o sin tacto rectal mejora la supervivencia.

Perfil del estudio

Tipo de estudio: Estudio de casos y controles

Área del estudio: Prevención

Ámbito del estudio: Comunitario

Métodos

La población de estudio estuvo formada por los pacientes varones >50 años que se visitaron entre 1989 y 1990 en cualquiera de los 10 centros del departamento de Veterans Affairs del estado de Nueva Inglaterra y que no tenían un diagnóstico de cáncer antes de 1991. Se incluyeron como casos los pacientes a los que se les diagnosticó un cáncer de próstata entre esa fecha y 1995 y que murieron antes de 2000. Para cada uno de los casos se seleccionó un control entre los pacientes que estaban vivos en la fecha de la muerte del caso hubiese sido o no diagnosticado de cáncer de próstata en ese momento ajustado por fecha de nacimiento y centro en el que se había visitado.

Un investigador que desconocía la asignación del paciente a los grupos revisaba las historias clínicas para saber si se le había hecho cribado del cáncer de próstata mediante una determinación del o tacto rectal desde 1991 hasta la fecha del diagnóstico del cáncer de próstata del caso.

La variable principal de resultado fue la muerte por cualquier causa. Como variables secundarias se utilizaron la muerte por cáncer de próstata y el cáncer de próstata progresivo.

Resultados

La figura 1 muestra el flujo de los participantes en el estudio. La edad media fue de 72 años. Entre los casos se detectó un exceso de pacientes de raza negra (10,0% frente a 4,2%; P

Se había llevado a cabo un cribado previo en el 14% de los casos y en el 13% de los controles. No se apreciaron diferencias estadísticamente significativas ni en la mortalidad total, ni en la mortalidad específica por cáncer de próstata ni en los análisis por subgrupos de los pacientes por edad ni en los pacientes con hipertrofia benigna de próstata (tabla 1).

OR (IC95%) P
Mortalidad total 1,08 (0,71 a 1,64) 0,72
Muerte por cáncer de próstata 1,13 (0,63 a 2,08) 0,68

Conclusiones

Los autores concluyen que los resultados de este estudio no sugieren que el cribado mediante PSA ni mediante tacto rectal reduzcan la mortalidad total ni por cáncer de próstata.

Conflictos de interés

Ninguno declarado. Financiado por una beca del Department of Veterans Affairs.

Comentario

El cribado del cáncer de próstata sigue siendo objeto de polémica. A pesar de que el PSA se ha mostrado eficaz para detectarlo, siguen existiendo dudas importantes sobre si este adelanto diagnóstico aporta más beneficios que riesgos. Desde que se ha extendido el cribado mediante PSA (sin que se haya llegado a la universalización del mismo), la probabilidad de que a un adulto se le diagnostique un cáncer de próstata casi se ha doblado. Por otro lado, la cirugía de próstata se acompaña de un elevado riesgo de disfunciones sexuales y de incontinencia. Valdría la pena pagar este precio si los beneficios en términos de mejoría del pronóstico estuviesen claros, pero los resultados de este trabajo arrojan más dudas sobre el tema.

En ausencia de datos inequívocos sobre la eficacia de una técnica de cribado provinientes de estudios de intervención, los estudios de casos y controles se han mostrado útiles para esclarecer la eficacia de algunas técnicas (como en el caso del Papanicolaou). Los autores de este trabajo han elegido como variable de respuesta principal la mortalidad total que parece una variable importante, que evita algunos de los sesgos inherentes a los estudios de prevención (sesgo del adelanto diagnóstico) y permite salvar el problema del posible error en la causa de muerte en el certificado de defunción. Un estudio de casos y controles publicado recientemente y que utilizaba como variable principal la presencia de metástasis por cáncer de próstata sí que encontró una asociación entre el cribado y un menor riesgo.

En 2009 está prevista la publicación de dos estudios de intervención, uno americano y otro europeo, que es probable que despejen las dudas actuales sobre la conveniencia de llevar a cabo o no el cribado.

Bibliografía

  1. Nelson WG, De Marzo AM, Isaacs WB. Prostate cancer. N Engl J Med 2003; 349: 366-381. TC (s) PDF (s)
  2. Barry MJ. The PSA Conundrum. Arch Intern Med 2006; 166: 7-8. TC (s) PDF (s)

Autor

Manuel Iglesias Rodal. Correo electrónico: mrodal@menta.net.